Carpow Logboat

A major project led by the Trust over 10 years, to excavate, recover, conserve and display a 3,000 year old log-boat from the Tay estuary. The results, presented in an award-winning monograph, led to the innovative Loch Tay logboat experiment.

In 2006 the Trust excavated and recovered a unique Late Bronze Age logboat from the Tay estuary near Perth. From discovery of the boat in 2001, the project took over 10 years to complete and resulted in two major publications and exhibition of the vessel in Perth Museum and Art Gallery. The Trust led a partnership including CFA Archaeology Ltd, local marine engineering firm Moorings and Marine Services, and both the National Museums of Scotland and Perth Museum and Art Gallery.

Excavation and recovery of the 9m waterlogged boat from the inter-tidal zone of the mighty Tay was logistically challenging and conservation and study of the vessel at the National Museums of Scotland identified fixtures and fittings, damage, wear, and even tool-marks from socketted axes and moss caulking used to make a boat water-tight.

Dating to around 1000 BC, Carpow is one of the best preserved prehistoric log-boats from Britain, the second oldest boat known from Scotland. To find out more, read one of our award-winning publications on the boat, which use extensive illustrations to tell the story of the discovery, excavation, conservation, but also how this remarkable find has contributed to our understanding of Bronze Age life in Scotland.

Project Partners:

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Publications:

These books and many more are also available from our online store.

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